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17 Best Garden Crops For Homegrown Tea | Herbs And Flowers | Beginner Friendly

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Spring is the perfect time to grow a tea garden! Imagine stepping outside, plucking fresh herbs, and transforming them into savory, delicious cups of tea. Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or a curious novice, this article will unveil the top 17 tea garden crops for cultivating yummy, delicious tea right at home.

Dry lavender and calendula flowers drying in jars.

From sun-kissed chamomile to zesty lemon balm, we’ll explore the art of nurturing these botanical treasures and share tips on how to grow each crop.

Sound good?

Then, let’s dive into the soil and sip our way to tranquility! 🍵🌿✨

17 Best Tea Garden Crops For Homegrown Tea

There are countless backyard herbs and flowers suitable for homebrewed tea. Here are our 17 favorites.

1. Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita)

Chamomile flowers brewing in a hot cup of tea.

With its small yellow and white fragrant flowers, chamomile is a low-maintenance herb that thrives in full sun to partial shade. It’s known for its soothing properties and is perfect for bedtime teas.

Chamomile has a complex flavor with an earthy undertone, subtle sweet floral notes, and a hint of fruit.

  • Zone: 2 to 9
  • Mature Height: 8 to 24 inches tall
  • When To Plant: Before late spring
  • Harvest Time: About ten weeks
  • Care Requirements: Plant seeds in well-drained soil and keep them moist. German chamomile is an annual, while Roman chamomile returns yearly.

Enjoy chamomile tea, a golden elixir that cradles your worries and whispers serenity as the sun descends below the horizon. Let its delicate petals remind you that even in chaos, there’s a soothing calmness waiting to bloom.

Read More – How To Start Seeds Indoors Without Grow Lights | Veggies, Flowers, Herbs!

2. Thyme

Delicious homemade tea with honey and thyme with lemon.

Thyme is for more than savory dishes. It also makes a delightful tea. Thyme tea has a mild, earthy flavor and is known for its relaxing properties

Thyme leaves also harbor antioxidants that dance with each sip. They shield you from life’s storms, like tiny umbrellas against time’s rain.

  • Zone: 5 to 9
  • Mature Height: 6 to 12 inches tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 60 to 90 days
  • Care Requirements: Well-drained soil, full sun, and moderate water.

Imagine sipping thyme tea amidst your herb garden. The bees humming, the sun dappling leaves. Thyme weaves a symphony of flavors, a melody of seasons.

3. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel in a sieve brewing some yummy homemade tea.

Fennel adds a licorice or anise flavor to your dishes and makes a delicious tea. Whether growing it in the ground or a pot, give it plenty of space to reach maturity.

Fennel’s licorice-like flavor also offers a sweet and slightly spicy aftertaste.

  • Zone: 4 to 9
  • Mature Height: 3 to 5 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 90 to 120 days
  • Care Requirements: Full sun, well-drained soil, and regular watering.

Fennel dances on the breeze, its licorice notes twirling. As you sip, visualize ancient spice caravans crossing distant deserts and feel the aromatic voyage through time and taste.

Read More – 11 Fabulous Thyme Companion Plants! [Fruit Bushes, Herbs, And Veggies!]

4. Mint

Yummy homebrewed green tea with mint and lemon.

A perennial favorite, mint is probably the first plant that comes to mind when you think of herbal tea. It’s easy to grow and offers refreshing flavors. Consider varieties like peppermint, spearmint, or chocolate mint.

Various mint cultivars offer uniquely refreshing, calm, and slightly sweet flavors.

  • Zone: 3 to 9
  • Mature Height: 1 to 3 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 60 to 90 days
  • Care Requirements: Partial shade, rich organic soil, and moderate water.

Mint leaves, cool and refreshing, awaken your senses. With each sip, you may feel yourself envigorated by dew-kissed mornings, a revival, a breath mint for the soul.

5. Calendula (Marigold)

Deep orange calendula flowers growing in the garden.

Calendula, also known as pot marigold, graces gardens with vibrant petals. But beyond its beauty, calendula flowers can be dried and steeped to create a golden-hued tea.

Calendula has a slightly spicy, peppery taste and is famous for its anti-inflammatory benefits.

  • Zone: 2 to 11
  • Mature Height: 1 to 2 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 50 to 70 days
  • Care Requirements: Well-drained soil, full sun, and regular watering.

Like sunbursts in a cup, Marigold petals infuse your tea with warmth. Sip, and let their golden hues remind you that healing often blooms where you least expect it.

6. Lavender

Lavender is superb for homemade sachets and essential oils. It also makes a delightful tea. Its floral aroma and calming properties are perfect for relaxation.

Lavender has a sweet, floral flavor with hints of pine and citrus.

  • Zone: 5 to 9
  • Mature Height: 1 to 3 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 90 to 120 days
  • Care Requirements: Well-drained soil, full sun, and minimal water.

Lavender fields stretch to infinity, and worries dissolve in their purple embrace. Sip lavender tea, a natural lullaby for restless nights and a balm for weary hearts.

Read More – What To Plant In A Plum Tree Guild [Examples, Flowers, And Herbs!]

7. Lemongrass

Tall healthy lemon grass growing in a beautiful tropical range.

If you’re a fan of citrus flavors, lemongrass is a must for your backyard tea garden. It adds a lemony zing to your tea and is excellent in herbal blends.

Lemongrass has a fresh, tangy, citrus flavor.

  • Zone: 9 to 11
  • Mature Height: 3 to 6 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 90 to 120 days
  • Care Requirements: Full sun, well-drained soil, and regular watering.

Zesty lemongrass tea is a delightful sip of sunshine, a citrus symphony as it dances on your tongue. When you enjoy your first cup, imagine sun-drenched afternoons and laughter echoing through lemon groves.

8. Bee Balm – Wild Bergamot

Fresh purple bee balm flowers harvested in a wicker basket.

Bee balm (Monarda) produces vibrant red, pink, or purple flowers. The leaves have a citrusy flavor, making them ideal for teas. Bergamot tea is a classic choice for herbal enthusiasts. You can also enjoy it as a cool summer sip or a comforting cup during chilly months, making it perfect for any time of year.

  • Zone: 4 to 9
  • Mature Height: 2 to 4 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 60 to 90 days
  • Care Requirements: Rich soil, full sun to partial shade, and moderate water.

Bee balm strokes your cup with crimson hues like a painter’s brush. Sip and taste the wild meadows where bees hum secrets. Bee balm is a yummy way to celebrate nature’s artistry.

9. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm herbs brewing a delicious and refreshing homemade tea.

Lemon balm is painless to cultivate and provides plentiful harvests during the summertime. Having it in your herb garden ensures a steady supply of fresh leaves for tea. It’s known for its calming effects and pairs well with herbs like mint or chamomile.

Lemon Balm has a lemony, minty flavor.

  • Zone: 4 to 9
  • Mature Height: 1 to 2 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 60 to 90 days
  • Care Requirements: Partial shade, well-drained soil, and regular watering.

Lemon balm leaves cradle sunlight, the essence of summer captured. Sip, and let its lemon-kissed calmness remind you that joy resides in simple moments.

Read More – Herbs That Grow In Shade – 8 Useful Herbs For Your Shady Herb Garden

10. Lemon Verbena

Yummy lemon verbena tea brewing on a wooden table.

Another lemon-scented herb, lemon verbena, adds a bright and zesty note to your tea. It’s a tender perennial, so protect it from frost during colder months.

Lemon Verbena offers an intense lemon flavor.

  • Zone: 8 to 10
  • Mature Height: 3 to 6 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 90 to 120 days
  • Care Requirements: Full sun, well-drained soil, and moderate water.

Lemon verbena, a whisper of lemon zest, invites you to slow down. Enjoy the sun’s warmth on your skin while savoring a yummy sip of calmness.

11. Hibiscus

Beautiful hibiscus flower growing with lush green foliage on a sunny day.

Hibiscus flowers produce a rich, vibrant red tea. It’s rich in antioxidants and can be enjoyed hot or cold. Hibiscus has a tangy, floral, and earthy flavor with a hint of sweetness and fruitiness. It tastes like pomegranates and cranberries, making it one of our favorite additions to tea or homemade dishes, sweet or savory.

  • Zone: 9 to 11
  • Mature Height: 6 to 16 feet tall
  • When To Plant: Spring, after the last frost
  • Harvest Time: Harvest time varies according to cultivar. Some hibiscus plants last 50 years! Regardless, hibiscus flowers are ready to harvest when they are fully open.
  • Care Requirements: Provide well-drained soil, full sun, and regular watering. Prune to encourage bushiness and remove spent flowers.

Hibiscus petals, crimson and bold, steep into a ruby elixir. Taste the tropics, the tang of adventure, the promise of faraway shores.

12. Nettle

Harvesting stinging nettle into a wicker basket.

Nettle leaves make a nutritious herbal tea. They’re high in vitamins and minerals, and the flavor is reminiscent of spinach. Nettle tea has an earthy and somewhat bitter flavor with a slightly sweet and nutty aftertaste. It’s not heavily sweet or floral, making it an acquired taste for some.

  • Zone: Nettle grows in various zones but is hardy in zones 3 to 9.
  • Mature Height: 2 to 4
  • When To Plant: Early spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: 40 to 60 days
  • Care Requirements: Grow in moist, rich soil and protect from strong winds. Wear gloves when handling due to stinging hairs.

Nettle, prickly yet nurturing, offers its green embrace. Sip, and remember that strength often hides behind thorns. Nettle tea is our favorite tonic for resilience.

Read More – Herbs For Bruises – 7 Herbs That Will Help Get Rid Of Bruises Fast

13. Ginger

Ginger tea with yummy lemons and mint.

Fresh ginger root makes a spicy and refreshing tea. It’s excellent for digestion and warming up on chilly days.

Ginger is hot, zesty, biting, sweet, and warm. It’s also savory, spicy, and slightly woody. Aromatic and versatile, it pairs well with various flavors.

  • Zone: 8 to 12, but you can grow it indoors nearly anywhere.
  • Mature Height: 2 to 4 feet
  • When To Plant: Plant ginger rhizomes in spring.
  • Harvest Time: 8 to 10 months, when the leaves turn yellow.
  • Care Requirements: Provide well-drained soil, warmth, and partial shade. Water consistently and avoid frost.

Ginger root, fiery and fierce, warms your core. Feel its spicy courage infuse your veins. All hard-working homesteaders deserve a yummy ginger tea, a warrior’s brew.

14. Roses

Beautiful homemade tea with purple rose petals.

Rose petals can work to create a fragrant and delicate tea. The petals add a touch of elegance to your tea blends. But make sure to use organically grown roses without pesticides!

The taste of rose tea varies depending on the type of roses used. Generally, it is mildly sweet with floral undertones.

  • Zone: Roses grow in various zones, but most thrive in zones 5 to 9.
  • Mature Height: Rose bushes vary widely, from compact shrubs to climbing varieties.
  • When To Plant: Spring or fall
  • Harvest Time: Harvest rose petals when they are fully open.
  • Care Requirements: Provide well-drained soil, full sun, and regular pruning. Protect from pests and diseases.

Rose petals blush with secrets as they bloom in your cup. Let their romance linger, a love letter to the heart. Rose tea, a fragrant embrace.

15. Basil

Basil leaves and some yummy homemade basil tea.

While basil is commonly associated with savory dishes, it also works well in teas. Basil has a distinctive and robust flavor. It is slightly sweet and peppery, with subtle hints of anise (licorice). Different basil varieties offer unique flavors. Try varieties like sweet basil or Thai basil. 

  • Zone: 4 to 10
  • Mature Height: 12 inches to 2 feet
  • When To Plant: After the last frost date
  • Harvest Time: 30 to 40 days
  • Care Requirements: Provide well-drained soil, full sun, and regular pruning. Pinch off flowers to encourage leaf growth.

Basil leaves are verdant and aromatic, whispering tales of summer gardens. Basil tea tastes like earth’s generosity, a basilica of herbal flavor.

Read More – What Herbs To Plant Together So They Grow The Best

16. Fenugreek

Fenugreek seeds and homemade tea on a wooden table.

Fenugreek leaves and seeds are famous in Indian cuisine. They also make flavorful tea and are reputed for various health benefits. Fenugreek leaves have a slightly bitter taste with nutty undertones. The seeds are aromatic and also add depth to dishes.

  • Zone: 5 to 9
  • Mature Height: 1 to 2 feet
  • When To Plant: Early spring or late summer
  • Harvest Time: 20 to 30 days
  • Care Requirements: Grow in well-drained soil, full sun, and moderate watering. Harvest regularly to encourage new growth.

Fenugreek seeds, earthy and grounding, weave stories of ancient healing. Fenugreek tea has a legacy of wellness. Benefit from the wisdom of ancients while adding a potent flavor to your tea.

17. Chrysanthemum

Beautiful and aromatic chrysanthemums in the spring garden.

Chrysanthemum flowers are popular in Chinese tea. They have a light, floral taste and combine marvelously with green tea and other tea herbs.

Chrysanthemum tea has a delicate, floral taste with a hint of sweetness. It’s refreshing and soothing, making it a delightful choice for relaxation or as an herbal infusion.

  • Zone: 5 to 9
  • Mature Height: 1 to 3 feet
  • When To Plant: April through June
  • Harvest Time: 90 to 120 days
  • Care Requirements: Provide well-drained soil, full sun, and regular deadheading (removing spent flowers) to encourage continuous blooming. Chrysanthemums appreciate consistent moisture and benefit from occasional fertilization during the growing season.

Chrysanthemum tea is the perfect farewell and welcome. Its petals, delicate as moonlight, bloom in your cup. Sip and let their grace remind you that endings are beginnings in disguise.

17 best garden crops for yummy homegrown tea.

Conclusion

Thanks for reading our tea crop garden guide!

We listed our 17 favorite herbs and flowers you can quickly cultivate for endless homebrewed teas.

Mint and lemon balm are likely our two favorites, but variety makes your tea garden more exciting and interesting!

What about you?

  • Are you growing a tea garden this year?
  • What tea crops are you growing?
  • What’s your favorite herb or flower for tea?
  • Have you tried growing any of the tea ingredients on our list?
  • Do you know any good tea ingredients or crops we missed?

We hope to hear from fellow tea growers, gardening enthusiasts, and herb nerds!

Thanks again for reading.

Have a great day.

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